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Do you need to keep MSDSs for commercial products such as
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7.7.2012
MSDS Procedures For Handling Definition
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7/7/2012 - Charlotte, North Carolina
MSDS Procedures For Handling Definition

A material safety data sheet (MSDS) is a form containing data regarding the properties of a particular substance. An important component of product stewardship and workplace safety, it is intended to provide workers and emergency personnel with procedures for handling or working with that substance in a safe manner, and includes information such as physical data (melting point, boiling point, flash point, etc.), toxicity, health effects, first aid, reactivity, storage, disposal, protective equipment, and spill handling procedures. The exact format of an MSDS can vary from source to source.

MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) are a widely used system for cataloging information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures. MSDS information may include instructions for the safe use and potential hazards associated with a particular material or product. MSDS can be found anywhere chemicals are being used.

There is also a duty to properly label substances on the basis of physico-chemical, health and/or environmental risk. Labels include hazard symbols such as the Saint Andrew's Cross (a black diagonal cross on an orange background which is used in the European Union to denote a harmful or irritant substance).

An MSDS for a substance is not primarily intended for use by the general consumer, focusing instead on the hazards of working with the material in an occupational setting. For example, an MSDS for a cleaning solution is not highly pertinent to someone who uses a can of the cleaner once a year, but is extremely important to someone who does this in a confined space for 40 hours a week.

In some jurisdictions, the MSDS is required to state the chemical's risks, safety and impact on the environment.

If you have any questions or comments regarding this article please contact Tim Swain at t.swain@chemway.com